Marina Quay

 

Marina Quay

Much of the land on the south bank of the Lee from the City Hall to Blackrock Castle is reclaimed slob land. In the 1760s, Cork Corporation began the construction of the Navigation Wall, which was also called the New Wall. The Navigation Wall was built to prevent the silting up of the river channel with mud. By the middle of the nineteenth century, Cork Harbour Commissioners began dredging the south slob land to allow larger ships, with a greater draught of water, access to the city quays. The dredged-up material was deposited behind the Navigation Wall. This deposit of compacted mud and silt eventually formed the Marina. When the promenade had been completed in 1870, the Gaelic poet and scholar Donncha Ó Floinn suggested to the Improvements Committee of Cork Corporation that it be named Slí na hAbhann, which means the 'pathway by the river'. Ó Floinn's proposal was defeated. The matter came before the Improvements Committee again in 1872. This time Ó Floinn suggested that the promenade be named 'The Marina'. He pointed out that 'The Marina' was the name given to recently reclaimed land near Palermo in Sicily. In July 1872, Cork Corporation formally adopted 'The Marina' as the name of the new promenade.

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